Alfonso Ribeiro Says Fans Have The Power To Prevent An Actor From Being Typecast
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Alfonso Ribeiro Says Fans Have The Power To Prevent An Actor From Being Typecast

Alfonso Ribeiro is known to many households for his role as Carlton Banks in the classic '90s sitcom The Fresh Prince Of Bel-Air. However, despite his iconic role, Ribeiro revealed in prior interviews that the role of Carlton hindered future acting opportunities for him down the line.

“I’ve always said that the idea that you can do something so well in your life that no one will allow you to do it again, is very difficult to go through,” Ribeiro said in an interview with Pop Culture. “Imagine being the greatest home run hitter in the game and never being allowed to go hit home runs because you hit home runs. Doesn’t make sense. But in show business that sometimes is the case. So having to reinvent myself by turning myself into myself, which is weird.”

In the interview, the Fresh Prince of Bel-Air actor and current host of America’s Funniest Videos gave advice on how to save actors and actresses from being typecast. 

“Every actor typically gets one, maybe two opportunities after whatever they’re really known for. Support them in those roles,” he said. “Really, if you’re a fan of somebody on a show, and they do something else, make it a priority to go watch whatever it is they’re doing even though it’s not what you’re used to seeing them do.”

Ribeiro went on to emphasize the power of fan support and audience viewership, especially when it comes to box office earnings. The actor encouraged film and TV watchers that if they are a fan of a particular actor, watch their films and shows.

“Be a fan. Support them as a fan. And at the end of the day, it’s always box office,” he explained. “If you go and do something new and it does really well, guess what? You get to keep doing it. If it doesn’t, then they start thinking, ‘Well, really, they just love him for that character.’ So just if you’re a fan of someone, watch everything they do. And that, to me, is probably the only way to break that cycle of like, ‘They’re famous for this. Well, that’s all they can be famous for.'”