Jessica A. Caesar's web series 'MEME QUEENS' is what happens when ex-beauty queens take on the internet

September 25 2017

In the age of social media, there's an immense desire to glow up-- to become internet famous and build wealth through likes, DMs, and sponsorships. Unfortunately, when you really consider it, most of us are basic AF and without any real talent, connections or money, longlasting internet fame is simply a pipe dream.

In her hilarious web series MEME QUEENS, actress and creator, Jessica A. Caesar explores the lives of two former beauty queens. Now in their late '20s, the ladies are desperate to ride on the curtails of reality stars and Instagram models. Too old for the pageant world, Nicole (Caesar) and her bestie Brynne (writer/actress Gilli Messer) sign up for a sketchy reality internet show. The show begins to pick up traction as the women's most absurd and ridiculous behavior gets turned into viral memes.

For $100 a day, Nicole and Brynne let some dude name Ron, film them in their home and at their job, an app startup called Petter where people join to engage in heavy petting. (Nothing past second base of course.)

Styled similarly to the NBC classics, The Office and Parks and Recreation, all seven episodes of MEME QUEENS were self-funded and shot over the course of just three days with a micro-budget. Caeser, whose acting credits include Atlanta, Vice Principals, Grey’s Anatomy and Grimm wrote all of the episodes with Messer.

MEME QUEENS was first presented on the digital platform, WhoHaha. Created by actress Elizabeth Banks, WhoHaha shines a spotlight on funny women around the globe who are creating unique and entertaining content. The goal of the platform is to get the content to a wider audience.

Peep the first episode below.

Watch the entire first season of MEME QUEENS here.

Aramide A Tinubu is a film critic and entertainment writer. As a journalist, her work has been published in EBONY, JET, ESSENCE, Bustle, The Daily Mail, IndieWire and Blavity. She wrote her Master’s thesis on Black Girlhood and Parental Loss in Contemporary Black American Cinema. She’s a cinephile, bookworm, blogger and NYU + Columbia University alum. You can find her reviews on Rotten Tomatoes, read her blog at: www.chocolategirlinthecity.com or tweet her @midnightrami

by Aramide A. Tinubu on September 25 2017

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